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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)
the best workforce... in the world by preparing a hundred thousand additional... math and science teachers; training two million... americans with the job skills they need atat our community... colleges; cutting the growth of tuition in hf and... expanding student aid so more americans can afford it. fourth, a balanced plan to reduce our deficit by... four trillion dollars over the next decade, on top of the... trillion in spending we've already cut. i'd ask the wealthy to pay a little more. and as we end the war in afghanistan... let's apply half the savings to pay down our debt and... use the rest for some nation-building... right here at home. it's time for a new economic patriotism, rooted in the... belief that growing our economy begins with a strong... thriving middle class. read my plan. compare it to governor romney's,and decide for yourself. thanks for listening. i'm barack oma and i approve this message. >> you are watching abc 7 news at 5:00, on your side. >> today marks the tenures since the terrifying day when there was a shooting -- today marks 10 years since th
all the furniture from the science wing. that'd show 'em. anna belle laughed her head-back laugh. learning happens in many different ways, i'm just saying. but even something this silly could get out of hand, and she knew it. the science teachers, especially, that was where scores most needed to come up. anna belle looked to the ceiling. after 15 years as an administrator, she knew ms. kaiser's kind. ms. kaiser was young, ms. kaiser had time and energy to spare and apparently tables too. [laughter] anna belle had been like ms. kaiser once, in another life, it seemed. can you tell carmen to lasso those teachers up? i told them, do not move furniture. then she hurried the talk along. ordinary drama made for a pleasant distraction, and after that there was still the matter of the squirrel eating through i.t. cables to address. after the meeting anna belle made her rounds. she came across a teacher agonizing over whether to shut down his fish tank. no be, anna belle told him, there's a living thing in there -- [laughter] so this next passage involves something that shouldn't ever hav
is in decline. researchers at the australian institute of marine science say the reef has lost half of its coral cover over the past 27 years. there are multiple causes, including a destructive kind of starfish shown here. we look at what's behind it and what's at stake-- in australia and around the world-- with nancy knowlton, a coral reef biologist and a chair of marine science at the smithsonian national museum of natural history here in washington. welcome. >> thanks. how has all of this coral died off? do we know what's causing it? is it all that... >> it's not all the star fish. the star fish is about 42%. typhoons, big strong storms another 48% and then coral bleaching is the remaining 10% which is caused whenever the water gets too hot. >> ifill: so this is human causedded? >> yes. most of it is human caused. i mean a coral reef naturally goes through cycles of up and down. but it shouldn't be declining by half over course of 27 years. >> ifill: i feel like we have talked before about the declining coral cover. but not... but i'm wondering whether it's now picking up speed or whether thi
best educated and best trained workers in the world. that is why we trained 1000 more mass and science teachers. -- that is why we insisted on 100,000 more math and science teachers. we need that. we want to recruit these folks fifth as community colleges, we know we can create 2 million american workers and give them the skills for the high-tech manufacturing jobs of the future. there are 600,000 jobs in america in tech today. that is why we paired up with community colleges, creating thousands and thousands of decent paying jobs, but they oppose it. [applause] we are going to cut the growth of college tuition in half. in the next four years. [cheers and applause] we have already reduced the deficit. in four years, we will reduce it by another $1 trillion. ladies and gentlemen,there is an easy way to do this. we have to make some difficult decisions. we have to ask fifth very wealthy to pay more. ladies and gentlemen, we are going to end the war in afghanistan as we did in iraq. [cheers and applause] in the process, over the next decade, save over $800 million fifth we are going to c
and manufacturers who create jobs here in the united states. we need to recruit 100,000 math and science teachers, train two million workers at community college, bring down the cost of college tuition. we need to -- [cheers and applause] we need to cut our oil imports in half. create thousands more jobs in clean energy. we need to use the savings from ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan to help pay down our deficit and put people back to work doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that's the choice in this election. and that's why i'm running for a second term. that's what we need. now, my opponent has been trying to do a two-step and reposition and got -- got an extreme makeover. [applause] but the bottom line is his underlying philosophy is the top-down economics that we've seen before. he thinks that if we just spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts that yes, skewed toward the wealthiest, if we get rid of more regulations on wall street, then our problems will be solved. jobs
question. that is sort of as much political science at something else. a big political factor, i don't want to sound too nerdy about this, but the rise of computer aids for districts are, the members of congress, state legislatures have created congressional seats in the house of representatives that are all democratic, all republican. there are relatively few seats. we have seen a bunch of change in the past couple of elections, but that is very much the exception rather than the rule. some members of the house of representatives fear, figure primaries more than they fear general elections, by and large. thus, they gravitate towards the margins of their parties. that does not fully explain the senate. because you can't redistricted senate, but it has had an enormous impact on the state and that the state legislature level. in the more polarized politics that we have. i also think that the news media plays a role in this. it used to be that there was a kind of shared set of assumptions and news. and everybody watches walter cronkite and they sort of made an effort to, you know, you could ar
provided by: and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the first presidential debate is behind them, but the two sides went at it again today. republicans said their man took it to the president in the denver duel. the obama camp charged the truth got trampled in the process. >> la night i thought was a great opportunity for the american people to see two very different visions for the country. and -- (applause) -- and i think it was helpful to be able to describe those visions. i said the president's vision is trickle-down government and i don't think that's what america believes in. i see instead a prosperity that comes through freedom. >> reporter: romney's reception at the event was reinforced by instant polling that he won last night's encounter
now i want to hire another 100,000 new math and science teachers. and create 2 million more slots in our community colleges so that people can get trained for the jobs that are out there right now. and i want to make sure that we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is too high. so i want to lower it. particularly for manufacturing, taking it down to 25%. but i also want to close those loopholes that are giving incentives for companies that are shipping jobs overseas. i want to provide tax breaks for companies that are investing here in the united states. on energy governor romney and i, we both agree that we've got to boost american energy production. and oil and natural gas production are higher than they've been in years. but i also believe that we've got to look at the energy sources of the future like wind and solar and biofuels and make those investments. so all of this is possible. now, in order for us to do it we do have to close our deficit. and one of the things i'm sure we'll b
,000 new math and science teachers and create two million more slots in our community colleges so people can get trained for the jobs out there right now. and i want to make sure we keep tuition low for our young people. when it comes to our tax code, governor romney and i both agree that our corporate tax rate is it too high. i want to lower it, particularly for manufacturing, taking advantage of 25%. i also want to close those loopholes that are get -- giving incentives for companies shipping overseas. i want to provide tax rates for companies here in the united states. governor romney and i both agree that we have to boost american energy production, and oil and natural gas production are higher than they have been in years. but i also believe that we have to look at the energy source of the future, like wind, solar, and biofuels and make those investments. so all of this is possible. in order for us to do it, we have to close our deficit. one of the things i'm sure we'll be discussing tonight is how do we deal with our tax code and how do we make sure we are reducing spending in a re
as a politicalf th science and journalism -- he pivoted to some of the positions that he explicitly set aside during the primaries, where he became truly one of the most -- there were others, rick santorum and newt gingrich -- extremist candidates on key issues that appeal to independents. when a pos -- one of the most interesting things in this election is the growing gender gap. you are too young, but many in 1992 called it the year of the woman, because of the showdown between anita hill and at then- being-confirmed justice clarence thomas. where were the women's voices? you had that sense when georgetown student center fluk -- sandra fluke was called to testify on contraception and it was an all-metal panel. -- all-male panel. would you imagine that in the 21st century that contraception would be raised as a polarizing issue, huerta taken -- where todd akin is talking about legitimate rate. that has led to the fact that independent women are alienated by these extremists. we're not talking about abortion, which i think is a right and should be in this country. we're talking about women's
acknowledges and celebrates recovery from addiction and mental illness, of advances int science -- through evidence based practices and thousands upon thousands of united voices of recovery across the country. recovery has captured an audience and is rallying in nations. about this time two years ago leaders and the liberal health field, consisting of people in recovery from mental health and substance abuse, met -- in on these efforts and in consultation with many stakeholders, samhsa has come up with a working definition and set of principles for recovery. i invite you to go on for .samhsa.gov.ww defining it has been a true process. now we are working with persons and recovery for mental illness and substance abuse to articulate the differences. as well as the commonalities of these respective prophecies. we agree on the guiding principles to recovery through terms and concepts such as hope pacs, a person driven, a holistic work. many pathways, relational, culture, addressing a trauma, strength and responsibility, and respect. a bit later in the program you will hear directly from a few
on the global list of whether it's science or engineering or technology or whatever it may be. what has happened to the american dream that has allowed things to get so low in so many key areas. why is the rest of the world overtaking and what should be done about it? >> i think it's priorities and values and greed, really, and at the end of the day, it's greed and lack of leadership to the point why i don't see how it makes so much sense how we spend so much money on prisons versus education, and that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacture things in america. i don't -- i don't get it. >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for just a second. one of the problems that we have with american manufacturing is we're an older manufacturing economy, and we areused to paper orders and contract processes and other things. if you go to china and have a network like ollie bubba. we know that we can move more into the internet age with our manufacturing in our bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy that many americans see it as or should it be a global trading
's science or engineers or whatever it may be. what has happened to the american dream that's allowed things to get so low. why is the rest of the world overtaking and what should be done about it? >> i think it's priorities and values and greed at the end of the day it's greed and lack of leadership tot point where i don't see why it makes sense that we spend so much money or prisons versus education. that doesn't make any sense to me at all. i don't see why we can't manufacture things in america. i don't get it. >> i want to pitch in on manufacturing for a second. >> one of the problems we have with american manufacture manuf we're older. we are used to paper and those types of things. china has natural sources electronically. we know one of the things we can do in america is move more in the internet age in our manufacturing and bidding and ordering process. >> is china the enemy as many people see it as or should it be a global trading partner. >> i think we live in a very diverse world and we need to embrace that. if china is excelling in something, that's great but guess what, america
they need, they resort to things like self medicating. the science has proven, research has proven this is a fact. our all of these or substance abuse, depression, those are the most common diagnoses in ptsd. what we're faced with is an archaic military justice system that has not adapted, even though their own their own military law reviews show ptsd and substance abuse-related misconduct are close the related, that there is a nexus that one comes from the other. what we are addressing -- we're not asking the military to not have people held accountable for misconduct. if you need to punish someone because they illegally or in violation of regulation of used the illegal substances, go ahead and punish them within the system, but that does not mean you up to go to the extent of imposing administrative sanctions that have an impact on the rest of their life such as taking away all their benefits and then putting a person without a safety net out into the community where they then become a problem in my community. and all they do is end of draining the resources of my community. and
of systems all of which are so important to the asia-pacific region. and we'll continue all of our science and technology investments across the board. the third reason why we can carry out the rebalance is that we're shifting our posture forward and into the asia-pacific region; that is, not what we have, but where we put it is also changing. by 2020 we will have shifted 60% of our naval assets to the pacific. that's an historic change for the be united states navy. the marine corps will have up to 2500 marines on rotation in australia, we will have four la toral combat ships stationed forward in singapore, i was just aboard both in san diego last week, and we'll proceed fully to build out our military presence on guam and surrounding areas, which is an important strategic hub for the western pacific. we will begin to rotate b-1 bombers into the region augmenting the b-52 bombers already on continuous rotation. we've already deployed f-22s to kadima air force base in japan, and we will deploy the f-35 joint strike fighter to the region. differently, we're sending our newest assets to the
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. trick question. i love everything about this country! including prilosec otc. you know one pill each morning treats your frequent heartburn so you can enjoy all this great land of ours has to offer like demolition derbies. and drive thru weddings. so if you're one of those people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day, block the acid with prilosec otc.. and don't get heartburn in the first place. [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. >>> here's a look at the state of the race in the swing states. here's the new polling data we got today. new suffolk university poll showing president obama in virginia up by two points. also brand new nbc/"wall street journal" marist polling on three other swing states showing president obama in nevada up by two. showing president obama in new hampshire up by seven. and showing president obama in north carolina also up by two. because early voting has already started in a majority of swing states, and
holding businesses responsible. >> in the light jacket. >> hi, i co-chaired the defense science energy security task force with jim schlesinger and i currently just been named the technical cochairman of the chief of naval operations vulnerability on energy security and i would like to talk about, first of i like to take the opportunity say that, the states and ferc on electricity and energy regulation, the states regulate almost exclusively for rate, rates, not for reliability at all. and ferc regulations are, they can take effect after a process that takes four to six years. in light of the rate of threat which is something else i wanted to talk about, we have no effective regulatory system. so i'm particularly concerned about sif and particularly concerned about cyber and i, i would like to call into question the perishability of cyber solutions. the lot of the discussion today, which i completely agree with all of it, focused on the cyber solutions to the cyber problems but i would like to point out that because of the rate of the threat, particularly with the bad actors, we might
have trained more than 1,000 math and science teachers. we needed that. we want to recruit these folks to our community colleges. we know we can create two million american workers and give them the skills for the high-tech manufacturing companies in the future. there are 600,000 jobs in america in tech today. that is why we paired up with community colleges, creating thousands and thousands of decent paying jobs, but they oppose it. [applause] we are not only going to continue to provides grants and tuition for after high school education, but we are going to cut the growth of college tuition in half. [cheers and applause] we have already reduced the deficit. in four years, we will reduce it by another $1 trillion. there is an easy way to do this. we have to make some difficult decisions. we have to ask the very wealthy to pay more. ladies and gentlemen, we are going to end the war in afghanistan as we did in iraq. [cheers and applause] and in the process, over the next decade, save over $800 million. we're going to come home with that money and put half of it down to reduce the debt
and science teachers. we need that to move forward as a country. >> that's a total, though, right? >> educating -- training two million new workers in our community colleges in conjunction with business to fill jobs that are open right now. boosting american manufacturing by ending the tax break that sends jobs overseas and giving tax incentives to companies that start manufacturing businesses here. these are specific tangible proposals and, candy, i believe that they will pass because i believe the american people are supportive of that. >> but they haven't passed. >> it will be rendered on november 6 wrth. >> no, they haven't. >> for two years jobs -- >> some of the specific proposals haven't, but, candy, think about the logical extension of what you're saying. what you're saying is so we select the other guy because he will implement the proposals of the republican congress has pushed to cut taxes by $5 trillion skewed to the wealthy, can't pay for it. that will add burdens to the middle class to slash education, to slash research and development. >> i'm not suggesting -- >> he
who create jobs here in the united states. we need to recruit 100,000 math and science teachers, train 2 million workers at community college, bring down the cost of college tuition. [ cheers and applause ] we need to cut our oil imports in half, create thousands more jobs in clean energy. we need to use the savings from ending the wars in iraq and afghanistan to help pay down our deficit and put people back to work doing some nation building right here at home. that's the agenda we need. that's how you strengthen the middle class. that's how you keep moving forward. that is the choice in this election and that is why i'm running for a second term. that's what we need. [ cheers and applause ] now, my opponent has been trying to do a two-step and reposition and got an extreme makeover, but the bottom line is his underlying philosophy is the top down economics that we've seen before. he think that is if we just spend another $5 trillion on tax cuts, that, yes, skew towards the wealthiest, if we get rid of more regulations on wall street, then our problems will be involved. jobs and prosp
, rational thought. the current party has waged a war in science. climate denial is horrifying. it's war on reason. you cited former vice president dick cheney that deficits do not matter. karl rove said it that we create our own realities. you live in it. a romney pollsters said we will not be restricted by fact checkers. i refer to a post-truth world. the problem is the policy oriented. the party has been captured by people like grover norquist who is a ferocious anti-tax ideologue who has forced many members of the house and senate to abide by his pledge of no tax increases. where do you get the revenue to help build the country? when people talk about the deficit -- it is not the deficit or debt but joblessness which is the great crisis of our times. the deficit and debt did not arrive from some inaccurate conception. -- immaculate conception. two unfunded wars, medicare part d. let them speak to that. mitt romney has it fantastical approach to arithmetic. at the bottom of it, there is a commitment and an ideology to insuring that the top 1% make out real well. those most vulnerable
to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back. i'm sharon epperson at the nymex. gold closing right now right where we started the week. gold prices closing just around $1,780 an ounce. we're down $14, $15 on the session. of course the fact that we got a better than expected jobs number means that we probably won't see quicker stimulus, though there may not be much change to what the federal reserve has already laid out in terms what have they're doing with monetary easing. gold prices this week have come close to the $1,800 level but have been unable to close above that mark. last week when china's back in session and we have geopolitics on the horizon, it could be a different picture. keep your eye on south africa in terms in palladium and platinum. back to you. >>> check out these gas prices. they're averaging about $3.80 a gallon pretty much across the country. but imagine this -- what if the u.s. started running low on gasoline? in parts of car crazy, california, my old home, that's become a reality and prices are indeed soarin
was held up the wilson center in june on science and technology and innovation. the symposia, which the institute co-chairs foot china's state council, not only promote dialogue among the stakeholders but allow the participants to develop personal connections. the institute also recently released an initial report on u.s.-china security perceptions, and other big project we are working on with leading research institutions in the u.s. and beijing. just last month we published the u.s. cooperation and clean energy and the review of the difficulties both countries face in developing solar, wind and other alternative energy industries and the potential room for cooperation. last november, finally, henry participated in another one of our national conversations entitled afghanistan is there a regional and gamecocks the story on this is interesting. he resisted when he learned we get organized a brilliant panel of scholars and reporters to comment on his remarks to the and we hadn't cleared the names with him. he didn't know all the people, and he was not happy. but he gave brief remarks
in things like education, making sure that we are continuing to invest in basic science and research. >> guys, he was flat in the performance why? >> no teleprompter. really in >> absolutely. >> why else, tell me . >> no passion. >> explain that. >> he didn't have enthusiasm for what he was talking about and he didn't feel strongly. >> you guys agree with that? >> yes. >> he is contemplating a bit. he has his record that he can't talk about. >> he couldn't defend his record and he couldn't get near his record. so how could he defend it? >> why do you say that. >> romney had facts and statistics and obama had generalities of helping people and feeling good, but not the tools to implement what had to be done. >> i mean, romney didn't have that man facts but obama did. i will give you obama is tired and he's president and it is a rough time and he knows he's president. and he aged 10-20 years and he's doing. and give you a little lack of energy, when he's out there. >> all rightt for the record, ken. you have more energy that barack obama. now we are coming back to you a little laterr o
the most government funded research to push the boundaries of science and technology so our best innovators and the entrepreneurs could pluck them and start these companies. if you think about that is a formula for success, and education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high school students drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming out of high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to the american society of civil engineers we are now $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration we have a policy to get a great education and then get the hell out of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h-1b issues that are so vital for our future strength. fourth, the rules for incentivizing risk-taking and preventing recklessness. i don't think that we have in any way remedied that the way we want and on the government funded research if it looks like an ekg heading for a heart attack. i don't know if they are relative to what. all i know is in the things that have historically made us great, on each one of those i see us not g
paths tried by abraham and jacob. we blaze new trails in science, technology, medicine, agriculture. in israel, the past and the future find common ground. unfortunately, that is not the case in many other countries. today, a great battle is being waged between the modern and the medieval. the forces of maternity seek a bright future -- modernity seek a bright future in which the rights of everyone is protected. in which every life is sacred. the forces of medievalism seek a world in which women and minorities are it segregated and knowledge is suppressed and in which not life, but death is glorified. nowhere more starkly than in the middle east. israel stands proudly with the forces of modernity. we protect the rights of all of our citizens, men and women, jews and arabs, muslims and christians, all are equal before the law. our scientists when noble prizes -- win nobel prizes. we prevent hunger by irrigating land in africa and asia. recently i was deeply moved when i visited one of our technological institutes. i saw a man paralyzed from the waist down climb up a flight of stairs
and self- discovery. >>> some san francisco residents can visit the california academy of sciences for free this weekend. it is all part of the neighborhood free days which is every friday through sunday through the end of october. people living in the zip codes there on your screen can enter for free this weekend. all you have to do is bring your photo i.d., each adult can bring up to six children. >>> more than 2000 soccer balls will be flying in the air at candlestick today. america scores, a local youth soccer group, will gather to try and break the guinness world record for the most soccer balls dribbled at one time. last year the st. louis chapter made history when 428 soccer players came together, but the united nations has since defeated that record with more than 2000 dribblers in the gaza strip. they will be at the stick at 1:00. >>> the petaluma little league team will enjoy a whole new adventure this afternoon. since advancing to the little league world series, the players took part in a town parade and honored by both the giants and a's. now the team will swim with dolphins at
the most government funded research fop push out the boundary of science and technology our best innovators and entrepreneurs can pluck them and start the new company. it you think about that as the formula for success an education we now -- well, roughly 30% of high schools drop out of high school. we used to lead the world in college graduates coming to high school. we no longer do that. on infrastructure, according to american society of civil engineers we're $2 trillion in deficit in terms of infrastructure. immigration, we have a policy now that basically says here come here get a great education and get the hell of our country. we are fighting on the simplest h1b issues that are vital phenomena the future strength. fourth the rules for incentive risk taking and recklessness. i don't think we have em i didded to the degree we want. on government funded research if you see in the gap it looks like ekg heading for heart attack. i don't know relative to what all i know in terms of the things that historically made us great, on each one of those, i see us not going in the direction we shou
with robert anderson, a political science professor at columbia university. good morning and thanks for being with us. >> thanks for having me. >> where do debates fit in? how important is it? guest: the base can play an important role. they probably take second place to conventions. they play a much greater role in changing people's minds. they probably play a lesser role when people are finally making up their minds. also, very early in the election year, when voters are just learning, there is a lot of volatility. the debate divides the time line. there are changes in the polls the only slightly greater than normally. host: there is a story from "the wall street journal" what do viewers and listeners look for? as they watch a debate text are looking for their candidate to in or aod zinger stumble? guest: 12% might be persuaded all but the other 88% are just watching. after the debate tonight, we will have many speculating on who won the debate and who lost the debate. in terms of voter preference, and in -- not a great deal will change. host: c-span is at the university of denver for the f
and every like to possessors of political science speculating in the abstract about the nature of international politics. you may wonder why it was because of fact the only thing worth talking about was at that point whether we could establish enough confidence between the two of us to risky adventure that opening to china representative for both sides shown that point of view, from a domestic, political point of view. and even though the subject of president nixon to china, was the reason why i came, neither side mentioned it until about 12 hours before. i mention not only to say i believe it should be followed to get your object it straight before you start haggling about details. we had no choice. now every generation and then was a great reform and i cannot think of any other country where you could definitely say that the evolution that we have seen in the last 30 years, depending on the vision of one man, as in the case of no other chinese who had the vision and the courage to move china into the imaginative system and to engage the reform and instituting a market system.
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 56 (some duplicates have been removed)